BROWSE ALL ARTICLES BY TOPIC

RELATED ITEMS

Articles by Topic - Manufacturing and Distribution

Listing articles 21 to 30 of 73

Departments: Reduce Water Usage, Eliminate Excess Waste

The food and beverage processing industry is known as the largest industrial user of water, consuming up to 20,000 gallons of water per ton of product, according to the North Carolina Division of Pollution Prevention and Environmental Assistance. And, with over 17,000 food and beverage processors in the United States alone, curbing this dependence on a community’s clean water supply is a top concern.

Departments: Track, Trace Technology Drives Business Improvements

The food and beverage manufacturing industry faces challenging market conditions on multiple fronts: product safety requirements, razor-thin margins, unique customer orders, and constantly varying stock keeping units. To meet such challenges, manufacturers turn to tracking and tracing tools. Capable of tracking materials and products within a single plant or throughout a network of plants, these tools have the potential to provide a complex range of benefits and competitive advantages. While tracking and...

Features: Sustainability for the Long Haul

Sustainable manufacturing and processing, which reduces raw materials waste and minimizes refuse, is more than a passing trend for companies both large and small during this economic recession. As companies using such practices see it, sustainability attracts consumers. But more fundamentally, it is good for a business’s bottom line.

Columns: It’s Not Easy Being Green

On the first season of “Sesame Street” in 1970, the soon-to-be cultural icon Kermit the Frog sang the immortal line, “It’s not easy being green.” Kermit was of course referring to the difficulties of being a small green creature. But the difficulties involved in being green are quite familiar to most industries, including food manufacturing.

Features: ONLINE EXCLUSIVE: Safety Challenges Remedied With New Technology

Some things never change. In the food industry, the need to ensure the safety of all products is one of those things. With the rising number of large-scale food recalls, diminishing consumer confidence, and increasing scrutiny from regulators and the food industry marketplace itself, the need to ensure the safety of the domestic and global food supply, coupled with demands for brand-protection assurance, have never been greater.

Departments: The Case for Product Protection at the Dock

Quality is no longer just “job one,” as a popular automaker once touted. Quality is, for food manufacturers, their lifeblood. Whether it is a cold storage or dry warehouse facility, maintaining a clean, temperature-controlled environment that is ideally suited to keeping products fresh can be challenging without the proper equipment.

News: Laser Etching Safe for Labeling Fruit

Fruit can retain its quality and remain tamper free with a laser-labeling system that etches information for biosafety and traceability directly on the peel, new research shows.

Departments: ONLINE EXCLUSIVE: Don’t Let Food Safety Get Lost in Translation

Last year, millions of Americans looked to the nation’s capital for the latest news on pending healthcare legislation, while other bills that are critical to our nation’s health and well-being worked their way through Congress virtually unnoticed. The Food Safety Enhancement Act of 2009 passed in the House, and the Food Safety Modernization Act (S. 510) is coming up for debate in the Senate in early 2010. These bills represent the first comprehensive overhaul of American food safety laws in...

News: No Differences Seen in Physical Quality of Retail Eggs

Commercially available eggs showed no substantial differences from one another in physical quality, no matter what production system was used, a study found. Specialty eggs such as cage-free, fertile, or nutritionally enhanced specialty types showed no differences in physical quality from traditional eggs, the researchers found.

Departments: Intelligent Safety Design Improves Productivity

Ask any food production line manager about the importance of safety, and he will likely tell you about the critical role it plays in protecting personnel, reducing injuries, and meeting compliance demands. These are all valid objectives, but food processors, packaging companies, and machine builders are missing opportunities to respond to the challenges of global consolidation and changing consumer preferences if they only focus on avoiding negative consequences. Instead, they should view safety as a...

Pagination

Advertisement

 

Current Issue

Current Issue

April/May 2014

Site Search

Site Navigation

 

Advertisements

 

 

Advertisements