BROWSE ALL ARTICLES BY TOPIC

RELATED ITEMS

Articles by Topic - Quality

Listing articles 81 to 90 of 139

Departments: Accountability Drives Food Quality

Lynne Hambleton, author of “Treasure Chest of Six Sigma Growth Methods, Tools, and Practices” writes, “Decision making must be data driven.” Indeed, the lean Six Sigma DMAIC—define, measure, analyze, improve, and control—is at the heart of food quality because excellence can only be achieved through accountability.

Features: Packaging for a Better Planet

Food production often has the heaviest environmental impact on the life cycle of food; measures that can be taken to reduce food losses are therefore important. In the retail and consumer sections of the life cycle, packaging plays a key role in reducing food spoilage and loss. Packaging can take a number of forms—from the cartons and bottles food is delivered in, to the packaging used to transport food to stores, to the bags we use to bring food products home. Appropriate and sustainable packaging...

Features: Answering to a Higher Authortity

“In God we trust,” printed on the currency consumers use to pay for groceries, is the mindset many are embracing when making food purchasing decisions. The growing demand for kosher and halal products is parting the waves to the supermarket with great force and fervor. Though not widely understood by non-devotees, kosher and halal are clearly among the most important and fastest growing trends in the food industry.

Departments: Get the Edge in the Race for Food Quality Gold

Cutting food service costs while maintaining high food quality, optimum customer service, and happy employees is a goal of nearly every food service establishment, from restaurants to retirement communities. Recently, Legacy Retirement Communities, in Lincoln, Neb., decided this was a goal they were ready to pursue. Now, with the guidance of national dining consultants Don Miller and Associates, Legacy’s dining services have cut costs by six figures, transformed a weekly resident pre-order approach...

Features: Pathogen Detection at the Speed of Light

Many people believe nothing is certain in life but death and taxes. Daniel Y.C. Fung, PhD, professor of food microbiology at Kansas State University, adds another certainty to the list: "Food processors must get accurate results from tests to detect pathogens in raw materials. This holds true regardless of the technology employed, the time involved, or the cost. A rapid test giving bad results is not good whatsoever."

Departments: Food Processing Technology Evolves

Welcome to the fast-paced world of food processing, a complex arena in which players must embrace strategic thinking to stay relevant and competitive in a demanding global marketplace. In this evolving world, several food-processing engineers are leading the way.

Features: Food Quality from Bottom to Top

At West Liberty Foods, a co-packer and private label manufacturer of sliced processed meat, poultry, and cheese products based in West Liberty, Iowa, food safety isn’t just a goal, it’s a company-wide mantra.

Departments: Freedom From Allergen Risk

A quick review of product recalls and withdrawals in any given week reveals that allergens, and the need to declare their presence in foods, represent a massive challenge for the global food industry. In one week’s recalls in the United States, for example, inaccurate labeling resulted in the recall of sandwich rolls (undeclared milk), ice cream (undeclared almonds), salmon spread (undeclared egg), and ice bars (undeclared milk). No category of processed and packaged food is invulnerable to the risk...

Departments: Get the 411 on Edible Oils

Edible oils are used in a wide variety of food products such as margarines, salad, cooking oils, mayonnaise, salad dressings, and confectioners’ coatings. They play a major role in determining the taste, texture, nutrient profile, and shelf life of food products.

Departments: Top Shelf Quality

Over the years, science and technology have led to a much better understanding of the underlying principles that make certain preservation techniques work. Some of the more common preservation techniques—heating, chilling, drying, salting, acidification, oxygen removal, and fermenting—have been in use for a long time.

Pagination

Advertisement

 

Current Issue

Current Issue

December/January 2015

Site Search

Site Navigation

 

Advertisements

 

 

Advertisements