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Articles by Topic - Quality

Listing articles 61 to 70 of 131

Features: Fish and Chips

An increasing number of recalls and cases involving adulteration of products such as infant formula, peanuts, and salami have eroded consumer confidence and put product fraud in the media spotlight. According to a study by the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA) and the GMA Science and Education Foundation, food product fraud may cost the food industry $10 to $15 billion per year. The melamine contamination of milk products, which cost the industry $10 billion and affected almost 300,000 consumers...

News: So Honey, Where Ya From?

A lone Texas A&M University researcher and a group of North American honey companies and importers are trying to halt the import of mislabeled Chinese honey.

News: Fishy Business

Using DNA bar coding, ecological scientists in Ireland discovered that a significant percentage of fish sold in Dublin was mislabeled.

Columns: Fighting Food Fraud

Prostitution has been dubbed the world’s oldest profession, but being an adulterator of food is a close second. Historical accounts make it clear that people have been altering foods for financial gain since the emergence of trade and bartering.

Columns: Pump Up Your Prerequisite Programs

This column is the first of two parts. Part two, which will run in our June/July issue, will discuss understanding and applying effective tools to ensure that your prerequisite programs are well defined and effective.

Columns: What's Right Redux

At the risk of seeming like a food industry Pollyanna, I wanted to publish an article that considers all the good things our industry does to produce safe, quality food, and that is just what we feature in this issue’s cover article.

Departments: Eating on the Run

The U.S. food service packaging demand will reach $7.6 billion in 2008 based on growth in away-from-home food spending,” according to a study released in 2004 by The Freedonia Group (Cleveland, Ohio). Food manufacturers responding to consumer demand for easy-open containers, portion control and grab-and-go packaging must be able to reconfigure production and packaging lines quickly and cost effectively. Yet, this is an area that has become more sophisticated. Conveyors and accessory fixtures that are...

Columns: Let's Work Together

A retired food quality and safety industry veteran wrote to me after reading my February/March column, “QA/QC Finally Gets Some Respect.” His food industry experience was impressive. But what really struck me was his outlook and foresight. He wrote that in his experience, wake-up calls in the food safety field never seem to last. He cited many food safety examples gone wrong and expressed the opinion that food safety is not an arena for politics, because bugs don’t care which party is in...

Departments: Tracking Food Safety

U.S. food safety legislation is in the works to create a national food traceability system that would help to protect consumers from foodborne illness and would enable food manufacturers to increase their responsiveness and ability to participate in the recall process. The objective of the food traceability system is to find tainted food and remove it from the shelves as quickly as possible. If the new food safety legislation is signed into law, many participants in the food supply chain will be affected...

Departments: A Checklist for Vendor Quality Assurance

Large, multi-plant, and international food companies typically have the capital and technical resources to manage their supply chains. Many of these companies have one or more departments dedicated to evaluating, selecting, and monitoring their suppliers and associated raw materials. This is generally not the case for small- to mid-size food processors. In some cases, on-site audits of suppliers to smaller food companies are not economically or technically feasible.

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June/July 2014

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