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Departments: Omitting Odors in Organics

Organic food is one of the fastest growing food sectors in the United States totaling $15 billion in sales in 2005, according to Organic Trade Association (OTA; Greenfield, Mass.). During the last 10 years, increasing consumer demand for healthier choices has driven the industry’s growth, from 17 to 21 percent each year. In recent years, fresh foods have become signature departments for many natural foods retailers, with independent natural product and health food stores and natural grocery chains...

Departments: Mini Menaces

It only takes an area the size of a person’s thumb to produce thousands and thousands of fruit flies. One adult female fruit fly can lay 15 to 20 eggs in a batch and as many as 500 batches in her two-week life cycle. A few fruit flies can quickly multiply into an infestation.

Departments: Incoming Quality Control of Water

Today’s modern food processing industries are heavily reliant upon water as both an ingredient and as an integral part of their preparation and processing functions. While in some instances the water used is further processed and treated by the food manufacturer, in many cases this supply of water is obtained from local municipal sources and under goes no further monitoring or processing beyond what is done by the local utility that supplies it to the end users. Unfortunately, in most cases little or...

Features: Coping with Shelf-Life

Raw or processed food products deteriorate during processing, distribution and storage. Unless it is sterile, such products will contain indigenous microflora and, in some cases, foodborne pathogens. Unfortunately, presence and growth of microorganisms or foodborne pathogens are not always differentiated by the quality changes in the product. To help assure product safety and quality, microbiological shelf-life and challenge studies are essential R&D tools for food processors and manufacturers.

Departments: Strengthening the Food Safety Management System

A foodborne disease incident can be devastating for any organization that supplies food to the U.S. market. The cost of a food safety recall is typically millions of dollars and can result in the closing of food processing plants. To minimize this risk, many companies in the supply chain require that their supplier’s implement and maintain HACCP programs.

Departments: Incoming Quality Control of Water

Today’s modern food processing industries are heavily reliant upon water as both an ingredient and as an integral part of their preparation and processing functions. While in some instances the water used is further processed and treated by the food manufacturer, in many cases this supply of water is obtained from local municipal sources and under goes no further monitoring or processing beyond what is done by the local utility that supplies it to the end users. Unfortunately, in most cases little or...

Departments: Timely Performance Measurement and Analytics in a Demand-Driven World

As discussed in parts one and two of this series, perfect order fulfillment for the food and beverage manufacturer in a customer-driven marketplace requires excellence in both planning and execution. This includes being responsive to customers, while forecasting and managing continuous and unexpected change in both actual demand and supply processing, through all levels of the food and beverage supply chain.

Features: Fishing For the Truth about Genetically Modified Ice Cream

The eel-like fish can survive low temperatures because of a naturally occurring ice-structuring protein. The protein from the blood of the fish can lower the temperature at which ice-crystals form, meaning that when used in ice cream, less cream or fat is needed, according to a BBC news release.

Departments: Don't Let Food Cost Eat Up Bottom Line Profits

Food costs are the most significant driver of restaurant business profitability. For a typical restaurant chain, a million dollar reduction in food costs has the same impact on the bottom line as a $25 million increase in same store sales or opening 22 new stores. When a small change in this key input can lead to a magnified impact on the bottom line, costs must be managed aggressively - particularly in today’s inflationary and competitive environment.

Departments: Exploring Options in Stored Product Pest Control

Three industry experts provide insight into new developments on the horizon for stored product pest control.

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December/January 2015

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