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Articles by Topic - Safety

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thumbnail image: thumbnail for: SPECIAL FEATURE: 14 Ways to Keep Your Ice Safe

Features: SPECIAL FEATURE: 14 Ways to Keep Your Ice Safe

Ever since JAMA ran an article on the food safety of crushed ice more than 60 years ago, the focus on the safety of commercial, crushed ice has been closely scrutinized. Ice should always be considered food.

Online Exclusives: Australia: Focus on Dairy

Online Exclusives: Australia: Focus on Red Meat

Columns: Food Safety in Australia

Australia’s food protection system sets high standards for accountability

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: Lawsuits Filed Against FDA’s Approval of Controversial Animal Drugs

News: Lawsuits Filed Against FDA’s Approval of Controversial Animal Drugs

Two different lawsuits have been filed by groups that include the Center for Food Safety and the Humane Society of the United States against the U.S. FDA for approving several controversial drugs used in food production without fully examining how they affect people, animals, and the environment. The products targeted in the lawsuits are based on ractopamine, which is fed to farm animals to cause rapid weight gain.

Features: Cybersecurity in Food and Beverage Industry

Managing and maintaining a security program allows companies to adapt as new threats surface and new technology emerges

Features: Food Security

Guarding the production and distribution chains from serious public health and economic consequences

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: No Differences in Livestock Eating GMO Food, Review Finds

News: No Differences in Livestock Eating GMO Food, Review Finds

Livestock raised on feed that contains genetically modified ingredients—in other words, approximately 95 percent of the food-producing animals in the U.S. today—show no signs of differences in performance or health, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California-Davis. They also found no differences in the nutritional makeup of the food products derived from these animals.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: Promising Step Toward Curtailing Pest Infestations in Tree Nut Orchards

News: Promising Step Toward Curtailing Pest Infestations in Tree Nut Orchards

Investigators at the Agricultural Research Service and almond industry in California have developed a new attractant to help almond growers monitor populations of the navel orangeworm moth. The attractant can be used to determine moth numbers during orchard treatments that are intended to disrupt the mating cycle of the moth or used as a monitoring tool during normal orchard operations.

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December/January 2015

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