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Articles by Topic - Pathogen Control

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thumbnail image: thumbnail for: FSIS Sets New Pathogen Reduction Standards for Poultry

News: FSIS Sets New Pathogen Reduction Standards for Poultry

“The American consumer has moved away from the Sunday roast and the whole chicken to buying chicken breasts, legs, and wings, and it’s a progressive regulatory and public health strategy to address that,” says David Acheson, MD, founder and CEO of The Acheson Group and a former FDA associate commissioner for foods.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: Pathogens Identified in Herbs at Farmers’ Markets

News: Pathogens Identified in Herbs at Farmers’ Markets

Fresh and locally grown produce available at farmers’ markets comes with some health risks, according to a study that found Salmonella and E. coli in samples of basil, cilantro, and parsley purchased at 13 such markets. The finding is a reminder that federal food safety regulations that govern large-scale farm practices don't apply to produce sold by smaller farms that sell their harvest at local farmers’ markets.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: Feedlot Buffer Zones May Not Protect Produce from Contamination

News: Feedlot Buffer Zones May Not Protect Produce from Contamination

Current buffer zone guidelines, which recommend that produce be planted at least 400 feet away from livestock feedlots in order to prevent contamination with airborne pathogens, may not be sufficient to protect produce from E. coli O157:H7, according to new research from USDA scientists at the Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Meat Animal Research Center.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: Mechanically Tenderized Meat Labeling Requirements Delayed

News: Mechanically Tenderized Meat Labeling Requirements Delayed

The USDA failed to meet the Dec. 31, 2014 deadline for finalizing and submitting its rule for proposed labeling of mechanically tenderized meat to White House Office of Management and Budget. What could have been implemented by 2016 will now have to wait at least until 2018.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: How Modernized is the U.S. Meat Inspection System?

News: How Modernized is the U.S. Meat Inspection System?

The U.S. should require meat and poultry slaughter facilities to collect better information on the status of animals and flocks, and regularly monitor data on plant performance, says “Meat and Poultry Inspection 2.0,” a new report from Pew Charitable Trusts and the CSPI that compares U.S. meat and poultry inspection practices with those in five other countries that recently made changes to their meat and inspection programs.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: Pathogens in Pet Foods Indicate Need for More Rigorous Testing

News: Pathogens in Pet Foods Indicate Need for More Rigorous Testing

A scoop of raw dog or cat food may also come with a serving of pathogens, posing potential risk to both pets and their human caretakers. Recent research investigated samples of raw dog and cat foods, exotic animal food, and jerky-type treats for presence of food safety pathogens.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: Fluctuating Trends Found in Antimicrobial Resistance

News: Fluctuating Trends Found in Antimicrobial Resistance

The NARMS 2011 Executive Report summarizes data previously released by FDA, the CDC, and USDA, and focuses on resistance to antibiotics important in human medicine and multidrug resistance. Among the positive trends is a decline in the five-drug resistance pattern called ACSSuT in Salmonella Typhimurium.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: <I>Cinnamomum Cassia</I> Oil Inhibits Bacteria Growth in Food

News: Cinnamomum Cassia Oil Inhibits Bacteria Growth in Food

Cinnamomum cassia oil, a spice widely used in Asian cuisine, could be a promising antimicrobial for the food industry because of its efficacy in inhibiting the top six non-O157 Escherichia coli STEC bacteria.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: <I>Salmonella</I>’s Surprising Weak Spot: A Single Nutrient

News: Salmonella’s Surprising Weak Spot: A Single Nutrient

Researchers looking for novel pathways to attack Salmonella and treat Salmonellosis, the unpleasant and sometimes deadly intestinal disease that it causes, haven’t focused much attention on nutrient sources. It’s been considered a fairly fruitless exercise: Most bacteria can grow on any of a number of nutrients, so if you get rid of one, they just gobble up another. But it turns out that Salmonella is a very picky eater.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: Scientists Test New Optical Sensor for <I>Listeria</I>

News: Scientists Test New Optical Sensor for Listeria

A new camera-like detection device now being tested by scientists at the University of Southampton, England, could collect and detect Listeria monocytogenes on food preparation services within a matter of three to four hours, compared with current assays that require more than 24 hours.

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February/March 2015

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