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Articles by Topic - Pathogen Control

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thumbnail image: thumbnail for: Pathogens in Pet Foods Indicate Need for More Rigorous Testing

News: Pathogens in Pet Foods Indicate Need for More Rigorous Testing

A scoop of raw dog or cat food may also come with a serving of pathogens, posing potential risk to both pets and their human caretakers. Recent research investigated samples of raw dog and cat foods, exotic animal food, and jerky-type treats for presence of food safety pathogens.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: Fluctuating Trends Found in Antimicrobial Resistance

News: Fluctuating Trends Found in Antimicrobial Resistance

The NARMS 2011 Executive Report summarizes data previously released by FDA, the CDC, and USDA, and focuses on resistance to antibiotics important in human medicine and multidrug resistance. Among the positive trends is a decline in the five-drug resistance pattern called ACSSuT in Salmonella Typhimurium.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: <I>Cinnamomum Cassia</I> Oil Inhibits Bacteria Growth in Food

News: Cinnamomum Cassia Oil Inhibits Bacteria Growth in Food

Cinnamomum cassia oil, a spice widely used in Asian cuisine, could be a promising antimicrobial for the food industry because of its efficacy in inhibiting the top six non-O157 Escherichia coli STEC bacteria.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: <I>Salmonella</I>’s Surprising Weak Spot: A Single Nutrient

News: Salmonella’s Surprising Weak Spot: A Single Nutrient

Researchers looking for novel pathways to attack Salmonella and treat Salmonellosis, the unpleasant and sometimes deadly intestinal disease that it causes, haven’t focused much attention on nutrient sources. It’s been considered a fairly fruitless exercise: Most bacteria can grow on any of a number of nutrients, so if you get rid of one, they just gobble up another. But it turns out that Salmonella is a very picky eater.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: Scientists Test New Optical Sensor for <I>Listeria</I>

News: Scientists Test New Optical Sensor for Listeria

A new camera-like detection device now being tested by scientists at the University of Southampton, England, could collect and detect Listeria monocytogenes on food preparation services within a matter of three to four hours, compared with current assays that require more than 24 hours.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: USDA to 'Super-Size' Ground Beef Testing

News: USDA to 'Super-Size' Ground Beef Testing

Beginning this summer, the USDA’s FSISwill do double testing on ground beef samples: Every time it tests for Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) in a sample of ground beef or ground beef sources, it will also test for Salmonella. This new approach will begin on June 29, according to FSIS’ May 16 Constituent Update.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: Study to Examine Vibrio Growth in Gulf of Mexico and Link to Saharan Dust

News: Study to Examine Vibrio Growth in Gulf of Mexico and Link to Saharan Dust

Vibrio, a bacteria that can thrive in the warm waters of the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean, may be multiplying more quickly because of dust plumes from Saharan/Sahel desert area in Africa that are being carried across the Atlantic and deposited in ocean waters. Climate models predict that the Saharan/Sahel desert will grow hotter over the next 100 years, setting the stage for more dust to be released into the atmosphere.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: Deciphering the Puzzle of ‘Supershedder’ Cattle

News: Deciphering the Puzzle of ‘Supershedder’ Cattle

In every herd of 100 cattle, odds are you’ll find about two that are “supershedders”—cattle who shed high levels of pathogens like E. coli 0157:H7 in their manure, potentially spreading it to the rest of the herd and raising the risk of contaminating meat products down the line.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: Deciphering <I>Salmonella</I>’s Battle Plan

News: Deciphering Salmonella’s Battle Plan

Researchers at the U.K.’s Institute of Food Research have discovered more about how Salmonella fuels itself to invade human gut epithelial cells—its first line of infection—once it’s in the body. By studying how well mutated strains reproduced in cultured human epithelial cells, they identified glucose as the major nutrient used to fuel the bacterium’s growth and reproduction.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: Searching for Causes of 2011 <I>E. coli</I> Outbreak in Europe: Natural, Accidental, or Intentional?

News: Searching for Causes of 2011 E. coli Outbreak in Europe: Natural, Accidental, or Intentional?

The Escherichia coli outbreak in Europe in 2011, officially assumed to be from a natural origin, may instead have been caused by accidental or intentional introduction of the pathogen into the food chain, a recently published analysis suggests.The source of the outbreak that sickened more than 4,000 people was identified as a single shipment of 15,000 kg of contaminated fenugreek seeds from Egypt. The sprouts from the seeds were assumed to be the vehicle for the deadly outbreak.

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August/September 2014

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