BROWSE ALL ARTICLES BY TOPIC

RELATED ITEMS

Articles by Section - News

Listing articles 81 to 90 of 153

News: Key Points of FSMA

The FDA has been given the authority to issue a food recall directly, without the requirement for hard evidence of contamination. The agency is now empowered to seize food that it has any reason to believe is contaminated, adulterated, or misbranded. This change was designed to focus the FDA on prevention, moving away from its current reactive role. If the FDA issues a food recall, it also has power to suspend any food facility’s production should the agency decide that there is an associated health...

News: Nuts and Bolts of FSMA

Because a breakdown at any point in the farm-to-table food supply chain can threaten the health and safety of consumers and cause serious financial repercussions for food manufacturers, the FSMA integrates with and expands the FDA’s currently established safety practices for poultry, seafood, juice, produce, and eggs, making prevention easier throughout the domestic and international food system.

News: Bumpy Path to Food Safety

Under FSMA, enacted in January 2011, the FDA is responsible for mitigating food safety problems by using science- and risk-based approaches to oversee about 80% of the nation’s domestic and imported food supplies. The plan includes establishing minimum produce safety standards, exercising the authority to order mandatory recalls of suspected food products, conducting a broad range of food facility inspections, establishing a comprehensive product tracing system, holding imported food products to the...

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: <em>E. Coli</em> Can Linger in Streambeds for Months

News: E. Coli Can Linger in Streambeds for Months

E. coli pathogens have already proven that they have a stubborn ability to survive in the human digestive system. Now, new research from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) shows that they’re also hardy enough to live for months in underwater sediments, sometimes even overwintering in streambeds.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: Americans Fear Japanese-Imported Food

News: Americans Fear Japanese-Imported Food

Only 25% of Americans would feel comfortable buying and eating food imported from Japan in the wake of the radiation leaks at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant after the earthquake and tsunami in March, according to a survey presented last week at the 2011 Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) Annual Meeting & Food Expo.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: Method Aims to Boost Eggs’ Defenses

News: Method Aims to Boost Eggs’ Defenses

A specialized cooling system that could strengthen eggs’ natural defenses against Salmonella is edging closer to market, reported the system’s developer, Kevin Keener, PhD, an associate professor of food science at Purdue University.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: FDA Outlines Ambitious Global Effort

News: FDA Outlines Ambitious Global Effort

Given the scarcity of resources, the U.S. cannot work alone to ensure the safety of food imported from other countries, says the “Pathway to Global Product Safety and Quality,” a new report from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that outlines its plan to work globally to track the movement of food and drugs.

News: Method Aims to Boost Eggs’ Defenses

A specialized cooling system that could strengthen eggs’ natural defenses against Salmonella is edging closer to market, reported the system’s developer, Kevin Keener, PhD, an associate professor of food science at Purdue University.

News: FDA Outlines Ambitious Global Effort

Given the scarcity of resources, the U.S. cannot work alone to ensure the safety of food imported from other countries, says the “Pathway to Global Product Safety and Quality,” a new report from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that outlines its plan to work globally to track the movement of food and drugs.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: E. Coli Outbreaks Point to Need for More Research, Expert Says

News: E. Coli Outbreaks Point to Need for More Research, Expert Says

Although they appear unrelated to each other and involve different strains of the bacteria, recent E. coli outbreaks in Germany and the U.S. underscore how much scientists still have to learn about this pathogen, said U.S. Department of Agriculture microbiologist Pina Fratamico, PhD.

Pagination

Advertisement

 

Current Issue

Current Issue

April/May 2014

Site Search

Site Navigation

 

Advertisements

 

 

Advertisements