BROWSE ALL ARTICLES BY TOPIC

Articles by Keyword - Cleaning

Listing articles 1 to 10 of 13

Features: Hygienic Design for Processing Equipment

The best cleaning system and most effective sanitizers cannot work properly if the design of the equipment does not follow basic hygienic principles

Features: Keep It Clean

Sanitation will play a big part in FSMA implementation, requiring proper disinfecting practices to reduce microbial contamination on equipment and other surfaces

Features: Eliminate Bugs Where They Live

Identifying the problem areas in the plant where microorganisms can find a home

Departments: Spot-On Sanitation Methods

Providers are meeting the needs of the food industry with innovative equipment, supplies, and services

Columns: Sanitation Equipment to Fit Your Needs

My last article focused on sanitation training and the five basic steps for cleaning a food plant. In this article I address the pitfalls, as well as the results, you can expect when you implement a high-quality food safety/sanitation system.

Columns: Drain Sanitation Delivers Peace of Mind

When we think sanitation, we think cleanliness, and when we think cleanliness, we think about an effective food safety program and the peace of mind that results from it. That’s why food safety and cleanliness go hand in hand. A clean area means an area with clean surfaces, clean air, and clean surrounding environments. One of the definitions of “clean” is “free from dirt, filth, or impurities.” And to make clean is to remove dirt, filth, or unwanted substances.

Departments: A Cool Way to Clean

Keeping food processing surfaces clean is a production manager’s main concern. Removing leftover food, grease, grime, and other residue from production equipment is critical for preventing bacteria growth and ensuring safe, high quality food products. As sanitation regulations become more stringent, labor costs increase, and the industry becomes more environmentally conscious, food companies are looking for new cleaning processes and solutions.

Departments: Prevent and Control Listeria

Recognized as an important public health problem in the United States, Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous, intracellular pathogen known to cause food-contaminating outbreaks. These microorganisms have the ability to multiply within host cells and spread from cell to cell.

Departments: The Case for Ozone

In 2000, the Electric Power Research Institute published “Food Industry 2000: Food Processing Opportunities, Challenges, New Technology Applications.” The report contains the following statement: “Ozone destroys bacteria, mold, mildew, spores, yeast and fungus. It inactivates viruses and cysts. Chlorine is not very effective against viruses and has limited effect on some types of bacteria … ozone reacts much faster than chlorine.”

Departments: Planning Makes Perfect

In the last issue we talked about the types of food technology, contact surfaces, cleaning chemistry and procedures. This issue we address time, schedules and basic sanitation equipment. When planning your cleaning and sanitation routine, start by quantifying time available for this process, then schedule the work and determine the manpower you’ll require. I recommend using the five-step process below to achieve the most efficient and effective results. Map out the five-step procedure for each piece...

Pagination

Advertisement

 

Current Issue

Current Issue

December/January 2015

Site Search

Site Navigation

 

Advertisements

 

 

Advertisements