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Articles by Keyword - Manufacturing

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Features: Kellogg Brothers and Post Pioneer Affordable, Nutritious Breakfast Foods

The Kellogg brothers moved the idea of dry breakfast cereals forward by pioneering the process of making flaked cereal.

Departments: Track, Trace Technology Drives Business Improvements

The food and beverage manufacturing industry faces challenging market conditions on multiple fronts: product safety requirements, razor-thin margins, unique customer orders, and constantly varying stock keeping units. To meet such challenges, manufacturers turn to tracking and tracing tools. Capable of tracking materials and products within a single plant or throughout a network of plants, these tools have the potential to provide a complex range of benefits and competitive advantages. While tracking and...

Features: The Peanut Butter and Pistachio Paradox

We’ve all heard the reports. “Peanut Recall Sparks Large-Scale Food Safety Concerns.” “Pistachios-Salmonella Link Probed.” “Fears of Tainted Spinach Sweep the Nation.”

Features: Sustainability for the Long Haul

Sustainable manufacturing and processing, which reduces raw materials waste and minimizes refuse, is more than a passing trend for companies both large and small during this economic recession. As companies using such practices see it, sustainability attracts consumers. But more fundamentally, it is good for a business’s bottom line.

Columns: It’s Not Easy Being Green

On the first season of “Sesame Street” in 1970, the soon-to-be cultural icon Kermit the Frog sang the immortal line, “It’s not easy being green.” Kermit was of course referring to the difficulties of being a small green creature. But the difficulties involved in being green are quite familiar to most industries, including food manufacturing.

Departments: Intelligent Safety Design Improves Productivity

Ask any food production line manager about the importance of safety, and he will likely tell you about the critical role it plays in protecting personnel, reducing injuries, and meeting compliance demands. These are all valid objectives, but food processors, packaging companies, and machine builders are missing opportunities to respond to the challenges of global consolidation and changing consumer preferences if they only focus on avoiding negative consequences. Instead, they should view safety as a...

Departments: Leverage the Power of Information

The proliferation of new information technologies has brought numerous benefits to the food processing industry, including improvements in overall productivity and efficiency. At the same time, the industry continues to experience major lapses in safety and quality, magnified in recent months by several highly publicized product recalls.

Departments: LIMS in Food Safety Traceability Efforts

Globalization of the food supply chain is a driving factor behind the increasing number of food safety incidents. Producers and importers must perform precise, real-time product safety testing at all stages of production, processing, and distribution to ensure quality and compliance with food safety legislation. Each step in the food chain has its own challenges. Laboratory information management systems (LIMS) play a critical role in the workflow of food producers, ensuring that test data from all parts...

Departments: Processed Air Ensures Food Quality

Compressed air and culinary steam are commonly used in the food industry in a variety of applications including controlling devices used in the processing operation (e.g., using compressed air to open/close a pneumatic valve), handling the product and or packaging (e.g., ingredients handling, product transfer, a drying operation), or coming into contact with a surface in direct contact with the product (e.g., clean in place, using culinary steam to sanitize a component of the processing system).

Departments: The Kitchen is Open

Only a fool would buy a new car without going for a test drive, and food processors now find themselves adopting a similar approach when it comes to purchasing equipment for their facilities. No longer content to simply sign off on the delivery of large ovens and chillers at their docks before trying to adapt the machinery to their particular processes, plant managers have sought a means to ensure, in advance, that such equipment is optimally suited for their operations.

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August/September 2014

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