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Departments: Planning Makes Perfect

In the last issue we talked about the types of food technology, contact surfaces, cleaning chemistry and procedures. This issue we address time, schedules and basic sanitation equipment. When planning your cleaning and sanitation routine, start by quantifying time available for this process, then schedule the work and determine the manpower you’ll require. I recommend using the five-step process below to achieve the most efficient and effective results. Map out the five-step procedure for each piece...

Columns: What is Sanitation Technology?

This will be the first in a series of articles on sanitation technology, with the goal of providing some helpful information that you can incorporate into your sanitation program, bringing it to a new level. I have found that providing training beyond the obvious on-the-job training will clearly show the sanitation staff that there is purpose and importance in working to keep the plant clean and sanitary. An investment in formal training is an investment in your people.

Departments: What ATP Sanitation Systems Cannot Do

Screwdrivers are designed with the intent to do one thing well: Drive screws, but the designers’ intent doesn’t stop screwdrivers from being used poorly as chisels, pry bars, door knobs, fondue forks, lawn darts, etc., etc. Likewise, ATP (adenosine triphosphate) sanitation monitoring systems are designed to do one thing extremely well: Detect and measure ATP on surfaces and in liquids as a method of determining the relative cleanliness of the surface or liquid. But the designers’ intent...

Departments: "Glug-Glug" Method Gouges the Budget

In years past, companies would put the responsibility of “measuring” their products in the hand of employees. Realistically, the typical mentality is if a little does well, a lot works better, and I can finish this job at a quicker pace. This “glug-glug” approach of product measuring drives up the budget. It also conceivably leaves additional film and adds time to rinsing the product/soil from surfaces. In effect, you increase your labor costs, and the bottom line is your overall...

Departments: Effective Sanitation Programs

An effective sanitation program is essential to the overall success of any food handling operation. Good sanitation will be rewarded with improved morale, better productivity and a reduced chance of regulatory incidences or recalls. These are reasons why it is important that every food handling establishment develop an effective sanitation program.

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April/May 2014

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