BROWSE ALL ARTICLES BY TOPIC

Articles by Keyword - Safety

Listing articles 11 to 20 of 45

Features: Study to Assess Pastured Poultry Safety

On average, some 1,500 broiler chickens are sold each year by pastured poultry farms—small enterprises that raise the birds in open-air pens or free-range environments, giving them an antibiotic-free, organic diet that’s USDA-certified.

Features: Water Quality Equals Water Safety

Michigan had an arsenic groundwater scare; children in Queens, New York, were hospitalized after drinking contaminated water at their school; Boston experienced a widespread boil alert that affected more than two million people; and residents in Caledonia, Wisconsin, went without access to public water for over a year due to a groundwater contamination caused by molybdenum, a dissolved metal that occurs naturally in the Earth’s crust and is one of the byproducts of coal ash. These are just a few of...

Features: Money for the Food Safety Mission

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) report Enhancing Food Safety: The Role of the Food and Drug Administration, released on June 8, criticized the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) approach to food safety. The report recommended that the FDA take a proactive approach by relying on prevention and surveillance rather than continuing its current reactive approach to address potential failures in ensuring the safety of the nation’s food supply.

Features: The FDA's Evolving Approach to Food Safety

On June 8, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) published a report on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) role in ensuring the safety of the American food supply. In response to criticism leveled by both food safety experts and the public, Congress had commissioned the IOM to examine gaps in the current food safety system and to identify the tools needed to improve food safety.

Departments: Safety, Traceability in Food Manufacturing

The volume and severity of food recalls in recent years are enough to scare any consumer away from grocery aisles and frighten any food manufacturer into thinking that its product might be next. The industry got a taste of that reality with the massive recall of Salmonella-contaminated products made with peanuts originating from the Peanut Corporation of America (PCA). By March 2009, the recall included more than 3,200 products, with the number rising daily. Then, just as the dust seemed to settle, a...

Departments: Detecting Polycylic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Food

The Gulf of Mexico oil spill, the largest in U.S. history, has raised awareness of a food safety issue, namely contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In the future, analytical testing for PAHs in fish, crustaceans, and bivalves will undoubtedly become a routine procedure for many laboratories. PAH exposure, through either environmental pollution or contaminated foodstuffs, and its effects on human health have been the topic of many scientific studies. The recent oil spill again focuses...

News: Antibacterial Paper Could Extend Shelf Life

A new paper that inhibits the growth of bacteria in food products could extend product shelf life and protect consumers from bacteria-causing foodborne illnesses. Overcoming the concerns associated with earlier antibacterial materials, this paper is nontoxic, environmentally friendly, and low in cost. The relatively simple processing of this antibacterial material suggests it may be commercially viable for food packaging methods in the near future.

Features: ONLINE EXCLUSIVE: Safety Challenges Remedied With New Technology

Some things never change. In the food industry, the need to ensure the safety of all products is one of those things. With the rising number of large-scale food recalls, diminishing consumer confidence, and increasing scrutiny from regulators and the food industry marketplace itself, the need to ensure the safety of the domestic and global food supply, coupled with demands for brand-protection assurance, have never been greater.

Columns: Fight Pathogens and Microbes in Processing Areas

Purchasing new or used equipment that adheres to the 2005 Food Code’s criteria and has National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) approval gives you a chance to properly clean and sanitize all food contact surfaces in your facility. No matter who approves the equipment, if you do not sanitize properly, the food safety risk will remain huge for your operation and your customers. We will now concentrate on some critical equipment sanitation issues.

News: Laser Etching Safe for Labeling Fruit

Fruit can retain its quality and remain tamper free with a laser-labeling system that etches information for biosafety and traceability directly on the peel, new research shows.

Pagination

Advertisement

 

Current Issue

Current Issue

April/May 2014

Site Search

Site Navigation

 

Advertisements

 

 

Advertisements