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thumbnail image: thumbnail for: The New Schedule for FSMA Rules

Mar 11, 2014

The New Schedule for FSMA Rules

FDA recently entered into a consent decree with the Center for Food Safety that sets firm deadlines for the agency’s submission of final rules implementing the FSMA to the Federal Register for publication.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: Tightening Up Standards for Infant Formula

Mar 11, 2014

Tightening Up Standards for Infant Formula

Last month, the FDA published an interim final rule to further safeguard infant formula in the U.S. The rule, which sets standards for manufacturers to produce safe infant formula that supports healthy growth, is accompanied by two draft guidance documents for industry.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: The 2014 Global Food Safety Conference

Mar 11, 2014

The 2014 Global Food Safety Conference

The Consumer Goods Forum's Global Food Safety Conference was held February 26 to 28 in Anaheim, Calif. with a record-breaking attendance of over 1,100 attendees from 50 countries. The annual Conference, now in its 13th year, brings together leading specialists to advance food safety globally. It provides the opportunity for attendees to benefit from various “hot” topic sessions and meet and network with industry peers on the exhibit floor.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: Are California Employees Ready for No-Contact Rule on Ready-to-Eat Foods?

Feb 25, 2014

Are California Employees Ready for No-Contact Rule on Ready-to-Eat Foods?

Employees at retail food facilities in California are prohibited from coming in direct contact with exposed, ready-to-eat food, due to a January 1 update to the California Retail Food Code (CalCode). Previously, restaurant workers were directed by the CalCode to “minimize” bare hand and arm contact with ready-to-eat food. Restaurants will have until July 1 to comply with the change to allow local health authorities time to get up to speed for enforcement.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: The Norovirus Versus Cruise Ships

Feb 25, 2014

The Norovirus Versus Cruise Ships

The outbreak of norovirus that sickened nearly 700 people—630 passengers and 54 crew members—on Royal Caribbean’s Explorer of the Seas cruise ship in January was caused by a newer strain of the virus known as the Sydney strain, the CDC reported. The strain first emerged in 2012 in Sydney, Australia.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: Autoclaving May Reduce Peanut Allergic Reactions

Feb 18, 2014

Autoclaving May Reduce Peanut Allergic Reactions

Treating peanuts with heat and pressure might help reduce allergic reactions to proteins in this popular legume, recent research suggests. Autoclaving peanuts for 30 minutes resulted in a significant decrease in the capacity of peanut allergens to bind to immunoglobulin-E (IgE), an international team of researchers reported. 

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: FDA Issues Draft Food Transport Safety Rule

Feb 18, 2014

FDA Issues Draft Food Transport Safety Rule

"This proposed rule will help reduce the likelihood of conditions during transportation that can lead to human or animal illness or injury," said Michael R. Taylor, the FDA's deputy commissioner for foods and veterinary medicine. "We are now one step closer to fully implementing the comprehensive regulatory framework for prevention that will strengthen the FDA's inspection and compliance tools, modernize oversight of the nation's food safety system, and prevent foodborne illnesses before...

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: Researchers Seek Ways to Reduce Porcine Virus Transmission

Feb 11, 2014

Researchers Seek Ways to Reduce Porcine Virus Transmission

Since the first identification of the PEDV in the U.S last spring, the disease has posed significant challenges to the nation’s swine industry. PEDV is not a zoonotic disease and does not affect food safety, according to the USDA. However, infection with this highly transmissible virus can cause tremendous financial losses to pork producers, the National Pork Board says.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: New Test May Be Fastest, Easiest Yet for Detecting GMOs in Foods

Feb 11, 2014

New Test May Be Fastest, Easiest Yet for Detecting GMOs in Foods

A new test developed by scientists in China claims to be the first comprehensive method available to detect genetic modifications in food. The test, called MACRO, is a combined microchip-PCR and microarray system that the investigators say can monitor 91 DNA targets in a single test.

thumbnail image: thumbnail for: Curbing Antibiotic Use in Food Animals

Jan 28, 2014

Curbing Antibiotic Use in Food Animals

A guidance document issued by the FDA in December aims to phase out the use of medically important antimicrobial drugs for food production purposes. The document asks companies that make animal pharmaceuticals to voluntarily revise the labels of these products to remove production uses—such as enhancing animal growth or improving feed efficiency—and restrict these antimicrobials to therapeutic uses under veterinary oversight.

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