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From: Food Quality & Safety magazine, June/July 2014

Scientific Findings: The Effect of Storage on Ricotta, Listeria in Vacuum-Packed Smoked Fish, and More

Exploratory Study of Physicochemical, Textural, and Sensory Characteristics of Sugar-Free Traditional Plum Jams
 

Exploratory Study of Physicochemical, Textural, and Sensory Characteristics of Sugar-Free Traditional Plum Jams

This study was designed to find correlations between the physicochemical–textural–sensory characteristics of sugar-free plum jams, which could prove helpful for the industry to understand the consumers’ preferences, to manufacture traditional food products, and to control quality. The qualitative study was conducted on eight sugar-free traditional plum jam samples differing in plum species, geographical area, and processing technique. Good correlation was found between the physicochemical indices and sensory attributes as well as between texture parameters and sensory scores. The electronic nose system was used as a valuable tool for discriminating the samples. CLICK here for complete article. Journal of Texture Studies, Volume 45, Issue 2, pages 138–147, April 2014.

 


The Effect of Storage on Nutritional, Textural, and Sensory ­Characteristics of Creamy Ricotta Made from Whey as well as Cow’s Milk and Goat’s Milk
 

The Effect of Storage on Nutritional, Textural, and Sensory ­Characteristics of Creamy Ricotta Made from Whey as well as Cow’s Milk and Goat’s Milk

The aim of this study was to develop a creamy ricotta using a mixture of goat and cow whey as the main ingredients, with the addition of whole goat and cow milk. The nutritional composition, texture, and sensory characteristics of the ricotta cheese were evaluated over 14 days of refrigerated storage. Protein and ash content was decreased and pH changes occurred during the storage periods. The instrumental texture profile indicated that the creamy ricotta was easily deformable, with minimal inelasticity and a cohesive, soft, and delicate texture. Medium- and long-chain fatty acid content was higher than the short-chain fatty acid content. CLICK here for complete article. International Journal of Food Science & Technology, Volume 49, Issue 5, pages 1,279–1,286, May 2014.

 


Listeria monocytogenes in Vacuum-Packed Smoked Fish ­Products: Occurrence, Routes of Contamination, and Potential Intervention Measures
 

Listeria monocytogenes in Vacuum-Packed Smoked Fish Products: Occurrence, Routes of Contamination, and Potential Intervention Measures

Contamination of Listeria monocytogenes in vacuum-packed smoked fish products at levels greater than the ready-to-eat food limit has been linked to factors such as poor sanitary practices, contaminated processing environments, and temperature abuse during lengthy storage in retail outlets. Intervention technologies have been studied to control spread of contamination. High-pressure processing, irradiation, and pulsed UV-light treatment have shown promising results. Potential anti-listerial effects of some sanitizers and combined chemical preservatives have also been demonstrated. The concept of biopreservation and a combination of different intervention technologies are also being considered. CLICK here for complete article. Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety, Volume 13, Issue 2, pages 172–189, March 2014.


Listeria monocytogenes in Vacuum-Packed Smoked Fish ­Products: Occurrence, Routes of Contamination, and Potential Intervention Measures
 

Conservation of Bakery Products Through Cinnamaldehyde Antimicrobial Films

An antimicrobial film containing cinnamaldehyde was developed to pack bread and pastry made without preservatives in this study. These products were wrapped with the antimicrobial films and packaged in low-density polyethylene bags. The antimicrobial activity of the films, the migration of the cinnamaldehyde in the films to the products, and product acceptance by consumers were evaluated. Samples of bread and pastry packaged with films without the antimicrobial were used as controls. When samples of bread packaged with the cinnamaldehyde films were analyzed, the films were effective in inhibiting the growth of aerobic mesophiles, yeast, and mold. The control sample had twice as much growth compared with the other treatments after 12 days of storage. CLICK here for complete article. Packaging Technology and Science, Volume 27, Issue 4, pages 293–302, April 2014.

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