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From: Food Quality & Safety magazine, April/May 2014

Letters To The Editor

Letters to the editor

FDA Inspections in 2014

FEBRUARY/MARCH ISSUE
FDA’s excuse in not completing the promised number of plant inspections due to the budget is a typical bureaucratic explanation. How can they spend so much money to inspect one foreign food plant? Do they think the inspection trip is their luxurious vacation trip? Because they don’t know the culture, area, people, and language, they hire an interpreter and take so much time to finish one plant—making more money for them. Why does FDA not hurry to establish third-party auditor system? Furthermore, in the U.S., there are many able foreign-born U.S. citizens who can understand the culture and language of the foreign countries that FDA wants to audit. By hiring and training them as an inspectors, we can save lots of money. The best solution is to hire the retirees from the U.S. food plants who worked as QA/QC managers, in R&D, and as food chemists. With a little training, they can perform much better than newly hired inexperienced FDA inspectors.

—Kuen Lee, food safety manager retiree, Unilever

Brand Protection in a Social Media Age

FEBRUARY/MARCH ISSUE
They [Don and Adrian] make great points. In addition, social media can be used to share best practices within industry to improve our food defense strategies. The Food Defense Strategy Exchange LinkedIn group is a great case in point. I think our own blog, currently in a series about the proposed intentional contamination rule, is another case in point.

—Ned Mitenius, senior consultant, Periscope Consulting

I believed that food safety is key in today's operations and any way out there that can be used to share best practices, resources, and knowledge should be considered an important part of any food defense plan strategy.

—Dennis Quiles, CPP, MBA, director of global security, McDonald's Corp.

Fingerprinting Food

FEBRUARY/MARCH ISSUE
Nice article, however NIR is an older technology, and may not catch everything. Try looking at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperspectral_imaging. The USDA has spent a great deal of time, money, and effort in developing this hyperspectral technology and are happy to provide the Research and Development data to implement this detection equipment.

—Steve Baryschpolec, consultant, Compliance-Engineering

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