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Scientific Findings: Freeze-Thaw Stability of Emulsion-Based Foods, Sanitizing Kiwifruit, and More

Alternative Sanitizing Methods to Ensure Safety and Quality of Fresh-Cut Kiwifruit
 

Alternative Sanitizing Methods to Ensure Safety and Quality of Fresh-Cut Kiwifruit

In minimally processed vegetables, namely in sliced fruits, chlorine solutions have been widely used by the industry for sanitization purposes. However, reduced microbiological efficiency allied to the sensory alteration and eventual formation of carcinogenic chlorinated compounds pointed out the need for alternative decontamination methodologies. Also, conscious consumers are demanding minimization of the potentially negative impact of food processing on human health and the environment. Therefore, the effect of different sanitizing methods as alternative decontamination treatments to chlorinated-water on microbiological counts, packaging atmosphere composition, color, and firmness of fresh-cut kiwifruit ­under refrigerated conditions was recently evaluated. The fruits were subjected to water, chlorinated water, ozonated water, UV-C, or heat-shock treatment to determine safety and quality. CLICK HERE for complete article. Journal of Food Processing and Preservation, Volume 38, Issue 1, pages 1–10, February 2014.

 


 

Factors Influencing the Freeze-Thaw Stability of Emulsion Based Foods
 

Factors Influencing the Freeze-Thaw Stability of Emulsion Based Foods

Many of the sauces used in frozen meals are oil-in-water emulsions that consist of fat droplets dispersed within an aqueous medium. This type of emulsion must remain physically and chemically stable throughout processing, freezing, storage, and defrosting conditions. Knowledge of the fundamental physicochemical mechanisms responsible for the stability of emulsion-based sauces is needed to design and produce high-quality sauces with the desired sensory characteristics. This review provides an overview of the current understanding of the influence of freezing and thawing on the stability of oil-in-water emulsions. It focuses on the influence of product composition and homogenization conditions. CLICK HERE for complete article. Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety, Volume 13, Issue 2, pages 98-113, March 2014.

 


Optimization of a Process for Shelf-Stable Dietetic Chhana Kheer and Changes in Physicochemical Properties During Storage
 

Optimization of a Process for Shelf-Stable Dietetic Chhana Kheer and Changes in Physicochemical ­Properties During Storage

Dietetic Chhana kheer has a shelf life of one to two days, even under refrigeration. Problems with such particulate foods have been sought to be avoided by adopting retort processing as there are inherent difficulties in handling such products in a UHT system. Use of retort pouch offers several advantages, such as the ease of handling, reducing processing time, and faster heating rates. Since retorting has been used to increase the shelf life for several dairy products, research was conducted to develop a process for the preparation of shelf-stable dietetic Chhana kheer in retort pouches with special reference to its sensory and physicochemical properties as influenced by various time and temperature combinations. CLICK HERE for complete article. International Journal of Dairy Technology, Volume 67, Issue 1, pages 73-81, February 2014.


Crystallization in Lactose Refining—A Review
 

Crystallization in Lactose Refining—A Review

In the dairy industry, crystallization is an important separation process used in the refining of lactose from whey solutions. In the refining operation, lactose crystals are separated from the whey solution through nucleation, growth, and/or aggregation. The rate of crystallization is determined by the combined effect of crystallizer design, processing parameters, and impurities on the kinetics of the process. This review summarizes studies on lactose crystallization, including the mechanism, theory of crystallization, and the impact of various factors affecting the crystallization kinetics. An overview of the industrial crystallization operation also highlights the problems faced by the lactose manufacturer. CLICK HERE for complete article. Journal of Food Science, Volume 79, Issue 3, pages R257–R272, March 2014.

 

 

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